Love, change

For the first time in a few years, change abounds. New opportunities, new people, new ways of working. Change is a friend not a foe and often signals opportunity more often than not. Each change seemingly a positive bit of momentum towards something better.

Change this year has come with work.

  • Mine escaping a company that just couldn’t grow up, empower, trust, or support. Good riddance on that negativity, hello new challenges.
  • My wife’s change, also work related, is emerging — an economic one brought on by evolving markets far from any controls or levers normal people influence.

You’ll find us both embracing opportunity. See you soon.

Art or business?

Jill Magid, the artist, reframing a situation:

In 2002, as an artist in residence at the Rijksakademie, in Amsterdam, Magid began noticing the large number of surveillance cameras in the city—anonymous gray boxes, mounted on everything from the corners of buildings to coffee-shop awnings. One February morning, she went to the police headquarters and explained that she was an artist interested in decorating the municipal cameras with rhinestones. She was directed to the appropriate police administrators, who told her that they did not work with artists. She thanked them and left. A few weeks later, Magid returned, armed with business cards and a corporate-speak sales pitch, presenting herself as the Head Security Ornamentation Professional at System Azure, a company that she had made up. The police not only allowed her to bedazzle the cameras but even paid her a couple of thousand dollars. “I realized that they could not hear me when I spoke as an artist,” Magid later said. “This had nothing to do with what I proposed but with who I was.”

Source: The New Yorker

The mind of an architect

In the early 1950s, the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR) at the University of California, Berkeley began developing new and different ways to analyze personalities. The scientists at IPAR attempted what many thought was impossible: to study creativity in a methodical and scientific way, working to determine what specific personality traits make certain people creative.

IPAR found that creative people tend to be nonconforming, interesting, interested, independent, courageous and self-centered, at least in general. Creatives could make unexpected connections and see patterns in daily life, even those lacking high intelligence or good grades.

Source: http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-mind-of-an-architect/

Time capsule

In 2012, Russian workers repairing a statue of Lenin unearthed a time capsule with a letter from a Soviet youth group from 1979. It reads, in part: ‘‘Let your character be courageous. Let your songs be happier. Let your love be hotter. We do not feel sorry for ourselves, because we are certain you will be better than us.’’

— Source: NYTimes

On controlling the narrative

There are different ways to control a narrative. There’s the old-fashioned way: Classify documents that you don’t want seen and, as Gates said, ‘‘keep mum on the details.’’ But there’s also the more modern, social-media-savvy approach: Tell the story you want them to believe. Silence is one way to keep a secret. Talking is another. And they are not mutually exclusive.

Source: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/18/magazine/what-do-we-really-know-about-osama-bin-ladens-death.html